Solzimer

Un/friendly Landscapes

arcaneimages:

This taxidermy was found inside a late 19th-century French mansion which has been sealed up for more than 100 years. Via National Geographic.

arcaneimages:

This taxidermy was found inside a late 19th-century French mansion which has been sealed up for more than 100 years. Via National Geographic.

(via perokettle)

“I was quiet, but I was not blind.”

—   Fanny Price, Mansfield Park (Jane Austen)

(Source: bibliophilebunny, via wylona-hayashi)

heaveninawildflower:

Cover of ‘A Natural History of the Nests and Eggs of British Birds’ by Rev. F. O. Morris.
Published 1870 by Bell & Daldy
archive.org

heaveninawildflower:

Cover of ‘A Natural History of the Nests and Eggs of British Birds’ by Rev. F. O. Morris.

Published 1870 by Bell & Daldy

archive.org

(via perokettle)

fashionsfromhistory:

Burial Dress of Margareta Francesca Lobkowicz

c.1617

Czech Republic

Regional Museum in Mikulov

(via mirousworlds)

nevver:

Looks like rain, Jeremy Mann

atlasobscura:

Hand of Glory: The Macabre Magic of Severed Hands

A traditional form of punishment, under Sharia, Islamic law, and in Medieval Europe, involved publicly amputating a criminal’s body part, often the one used to commit a crime.

The pain of the amputation and the shame of the permanent mark served as punishment for the criminal, while the display of the severed limb functioned as a sinister warning to all onlookers: follow in this guy’s footsteps and you will suffer a similar fate. This macabre tradition likely has its roots in the Code of Hammurabi.

In Europe, the severed hands of criminals were displayed like relics to prevent future grievances (a thief’s arm still dangles in a Prague church). In most cases the owner of the hand was not known, but the provenance was usually irrelevant because the setting of the hand’s exhibition determined the story that was told about its origin.

The Haunch of Venison in Wiltshire, England, is a 684-year-old pub that was famous for its display of a cursed gambler’s hand. The hand was reportedly amputated from a gambler who was caught cheating during a game of whist a few hundred years ago. According to workers at the pub, a butcher chopped the gambler’s hand off and threw it into the fireplace. The grisly relic was discovered during renovation work at the pub in 1911 and was stored in a locked glass case with a pack of 18th century playing cards. In 2010, thieves unscrewed the glass cabinet and stole the criminal’s relic.

For the full, sordid history of severed hands, keep reading on Atlas Obscura!

Frazetta

(Source: trucs-et-bidules, via cometsofdoom)

uromancy:

Louis Daguerre. The Ruins of Holyrood Chapel. 1824.

uromancy:

Louis Daguerre. The Ruins of Holyrood Chapel. 1824.

(via antiqueart)

nae-design:

Maruyama Ōkyo | 1733 - 1795

(via lumpycurvy)

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Illustration by Cheri Herouard
For La Vie Parisienne
July 1927

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Illustration by Cheri Herouard

For La Vie Parisienne

July 1927

(via daddyfuckedme)

deathandmysticism:

Matteo di Giovanni, St. Bartholomew holding his own skin, ca. 1480

deathandmysticism:

Matteo di Giovanni, St. Bartholomew holding his own skin, ca. 1480

(via medieval)

dreaminparis:

Water Creature by John Bauer, 1977

dreaminparis:

Water Creature by John Bauer, 1977

(via lord-nautilus)

conceptnoir:

Benjamin Carbonne

conceptnoir:

Benjamin Carbonne

(Source: livefast-fightbears, via cosmos-reverie)